Microcosm/Macrocosm: Recent Work by Andrew David Stark

January 1, 1970 - to
Microcosm/Macrocosm: Recent Work by Andrew David Stark

Currently on display in the Ruth & Seymour Landfield Atrium, the exhibition Microcosm/Macrocosm: Recent Work by Andrew David Stark is certainly titled accurately. Stark’s thematic choice of imagery invoking large, cosmic structures and infinitesimal, subatomic structures can be appreciated up close or far away.

Andrew David Stark

Stark said of this recent exhibition:

“The surface and content of these paintings is meant to visually express micro and macro worlds and the dichotomy between observable and unobservable worlds. These paintings both reference and combine the hypnotic optical effects of half-tone patterns, optical art, the vortex of black holes, molecular structures, and ethereal nebulous clouds. This exploration into coexisting micro and macro space attempts to capture the wonder, mystery, and awe humans have experienced for thousands of years when confronted with the immensity and complexity of nature.”

Andrew David Stark Exhibition

Andrew David Stark exhibition

This painting series will be up in the Atrium from now until June 27. You can learn a bit more about Andrew David Stark here.

(“Telescopics” courtesy of ecce contemporary.)

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Microcosm/Macrocosm: Recent Work by Andrew David Stark

January 1, 1970 - to
Microcosm/Macrocosm: Recent Work by Andrew David Stark

Currently on display in the Ruth & Seymour Landfield Atrium, the exhibition Microcosm/Macrocosm: Recent Work by Andrew David Stark is certainly titled accurately. Stark’s thematic choice of imagery invoking large, cosmic structures and infinitesimal, subatomic structures can be appreciated up close or far away.

Andrew David Stark

Stark said of this recent exhibition:

“The surface and content of these paintings is meant to visually express micro and macro worlds and the dichotomy between observable and unobservable worlds. These paintings both reference and combine the hypnotic optical effects of half-tone patterns, optical art, the vortex of black holes, molecular structures, and ethereal nebulous clouds. This exploration into coexisting micro and macro space attempts to capture the wonder, mystery, and awe humans have experienced for thousands of years when confronted with the immensity and complexity of nature.”

Andrew David Stark Exhibition

Andrew David Stark exhibition

This painting series will be up in the Atrium from now until June 27. You can learn a bit more about Andrew David Stark here.

(“Telescopics” courtesy of ecce contemporary.)

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Architecture for the Birds

January 1, 1970 - to
Architecture for the Birds

An intriguing project is on display through the weekend in our Atrium – Architecture for the Birds: A Design Competition for Beginning Architecture Students. NDSU architecture students have taken the needs of a particular species of bird, then designed a house that fits their needs while calling upon the design philosophy of a well-known architect. Here’s a photo:

This is a home designed for an eastern bluebird designed around the philosophy of Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, designers of the De Young Museum in San Francisco. The designer of the birdhouse writes that “a focus on the strong parallel lines used in the landscape, rooftop and interior spaces inspired my design.”

Another:

This is a home for a kestrel, a type of falcon. It’s designed around the work of modernist architect Richard Meier and based on his design for the Jubilee Church in Rome.

And one more:

This design is for the aptly named house wren inspired by the work of British architect Richard Rogers. As wrens typically build nests in tangles and thickets, Rogers’ functionalist idea that the inner workings of a building be made visible mirrors the needs of the wren.

So far, we’ve seen a sizable turnout of visitors to see the houses and our usual Thursday lunch crowd took a few curious moments to wander among them. Not only are they interesting on their own, but the display itself, overall, is a bit of eye candy:

Again, the birdhouses will only be up through the weekend, so come by and vote for your favorite. The winner of the vote will receive a “people’s choice” award. A professional jury will also award prizes. The Audobon Society will hold an auction of the birdhouses after their display in an effort to support the health and habitat of birds in our region. You can go to www.audobon.org for details.

(All photos by Britta Trygstad, Milestones Photography)

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S.P.A.C.E. Vote Winner

January 1, 1970 - to
S.P.A.C.E. Vote Winner

Star Monster

A couple weeks ago, I wrote about the vote taking place in our atrium for the S.P.A.C.E. (Sculpture Pad Art Collaborative Experiment) Project. We displayed five proposals from students at Minnesota State University Moorhead for a piece that will be completed and displayed over the summer on our outdoor sculpture pad. Visitors were asked to vote for their favorites with the winner getting the green light to create the final project.

The results of the vote are now in, and the winner is…

(drum roll)

Star Monster (left)!

This colorful and slightly enigmatic piece will be constructed out of sheet metal, pressure-treated lumber and fiberglass resin. The finished project is scheduled to go up sometime in late April where it will remain through October. Congratulations to the winning students and a hearty thank you to all of the participants (you can see all of the submissions here).

View Event

S.P.A.C.E. Vote Winner

January 1, 1970 - to
S.P.A.C.E. Vote Winner

Star Monster

A couple weeks ago, I wrote about the vote taking place in our atrium for the S.P.A.C.E. (Sculpture Pad Art Collaborative Experiment) Project. We displayed five proposals from students at Minnesota State University Moorhead for a piece that will be completed and displayed over the summer on our outdoor sculpture pad. Visitors were asked to vote for their favorites with the winner getting the green light to create the final project.

The results of the vote are now in, and the winner is…

(drum roll)

Star Monster (left)!

This colorful and slightly enigmatic piece will be constructed out of sheet metal, pressure-treated lumber and fiberglass resin. The finished project is scheduled to go up sometime in late April where it will remain through October. Congratulations to the winning students and a hearty thank you to all of the participants (you can see all of the submissions here).

View Event

We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

January 1, 1970 - to
We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

Visitors of all ages took in the School Spirit reception.

On Sunday, the Museum hosted a reception in observation of Youth Art Month, celebrating the work of hundreds of K-12 student artists from around the region. Over 700 students, parents, and observers attended, browsing some 300 art works representing 731 students. Many pieces were collaborations among large groups of students, while others represented individual selections made by the students’ teachers.

Youth Art Month was founded in 1961 (Wikipedia) by the Arts & Creative Materials Institute, Inc., (ACMI) in cooperation with the National Art Education Association (NAEA), as a way to stress the value of art education in the development of young people, to secure the commitment of the general public to the cause of art education, and to raise awareness of art education issues with government and community leaders. Further, Youth Art Month offers a perfect opportunity to celebrate the efforts of budding artists at the beginning of their artistic lives.

Two attendees watch a performance by the Fargo Moorhead Youth Symphony.

Back in 2003, the Museum began encouraging art educators in Fargo-Moorhead and neighboring communities to select student art for display during Youth Art Month. Since then, participation with the project and attendance at the reception have grown substantially each year; our first year, 150 people came to the reception. Over seven years, it has increased to 700 attendees.

Students and teachers both enjoyed the opportunity to have student work featured in the show. Hannah Juhnke, a 10th grader from Hawley, Minn., gave credit to her teacher, Tara Hager, for finding this outlet for her students.

“There aren’t a lot of art museums around Hawley,” Juhnke said, with a laugh (You can see her graphite drawing “Tender Sympathy”, below). “Mrs. Hager is the one that seeks out different competitions and art museums where our work can be featured.” She plans on pursuing a career in the arts after high school. Paige Davis, a senior from Hawley, doesn’t want to make art for a living but she was still excited to be part of the exhibition.

Paige Davis, "Laugh Out Loud"

“I never thought my cow would make it here,” she said, referencing her print (right). “It’s pretty cool to come here and see everyone’s stuff.”

Hager and fellow teacher Hannah Meyer, a K-6 art teacher from Pelican Rapids, Minn., agreed that the exhibition was an important part of a larger effort to instill artistic skills at a crucial age. Although the decision of which pieces were to be included in the show rested in their hands, Meyer said that selecting the pieces was a good way to acknowledge deserving students.

“I have a school of 450 students and I could only choose four or five pieces,” Meyer said. “It was hard, but it wasn’t. You pick kids that really work hard and deserve it and would appreciate the opportunity to have their work hanging in a show like this.”

Ben-Haim was equally excited for the opportunities the students received as well as the opportunity for families to visit the exhibition together.

“Everybody is so thankful for the attention,” she said. “The students are proud, the parents are proud. It’s really nice.”

Hannah Juhnke, "Tender Sympathy"

The student work will remain on exhibit through March 28 on the 3rd floor of the Museum. If you have any questions about the exhibition or about Youth Art Month, please call Sandy at 701.232.3821 ext. 109.

View Event

We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

January 1, 1970 - to
We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

Visitors of all ages took in the School Spirit reception.

On Sunday, the Museum hosted a reception in observation of Youth Art Month, celebrating the work of hundreds of K-12 student artists from around the region. Over 700 students, parents, and observers attended, browsing some 300 art works representing 731 students. Many pieces were collaborations among large groups of students, while others represented individual selections made by the students’ teachers.

Youth Art Month was founded in 1961 (Wikipedia) by the Arts & Creative Materials Institute, Inc., (ACMI) in cooperation with the National Art Education Association (NAEA), as a way to stress the value of art education in the development of young people, to secure the commitment of the general public to the cause of art education, and to raise awareness of art education issues with government and community leaders. Further, Youth Art Month offers a perfect opportunity to celebrate the efforts of budding artists at the beginning of their artistic lives.

Two attendees watch a performance by the Fargo Moorhead Youth Symphony.

Back in 2003, the Museum began encouraging art educators in Fargo-Moorhead and neighboring communities to select student art for display during Youth Art Month. Since then, participation with the project and attendance at the reception have grown substantially each year; our first year, 150 people came to the reception. Over seven years, it has increased to 700 attendees.

Students and teachers both enjoyed the opportunity to have student work featured in the show. Hannah Juhnke, a 10th grader from Hawley, Minn., gave credit to her teacher, Tara Hager, for finding this outlet for her students.

“There aren’t a lot of art museums around Hawley,” Juhnke said, with a laugh (You can see her graphite drawing “Tender Sympathy”, below). “Mrs. Hager is the one that seeks out different competitions and art museums where our work can be featured.” She plans on pursuing a career in the arts after high school. Paige Davis, a senior from Hawley, doesn’t want to make art for a living but she was still excited to be part of the exhibition.

Paige Davis, "Laugh Out Loud"

“I never thought my cow would make it here,” she said, referencing her print (right). “It’s pretty cool to come here and see everyone’s stuff.”

Hager and fellow teacher Hannah Meyer, a K-6 art teacher from Pelican Rapids, Minn., agreed that the exhibition was an important part of a larger effort to instill artistic skills at a crucial age. Although the decision of which pieces were to be included in the show rested in their hands, Meyer said that selecting the pieces was a good way to acknowledge deserving students.

“I have a school of 450 students and I could only choose four or five pieces,” Meyer said. “It was hard, but it wasn’t. You pick kids that really work hard and deserve it and would appreciate the opportunity to have their work hanging in a show like this.”

Ben-Haim was equally excited for the opportunities the students received as well as the opportunity for families to visit the exhibition together.

“Everybody is so thankful for the attention,” she said. “The students are proud, the parents are proud. It’s really nice.”

Hannah Juhnke, "Tender Sympathy"

The student work will remain on exhibit through March 28 on the 3rd floor of the Museum. If you have any questions about the exhibition or about Youth Art Month, please call Sandy at 701.232.3821 ext. 109.

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Alec Soth Talks About ‘Lenny’

January 1, 1970 - to
Alec Soth Talks About ‘Lenny’

Photographer Alec Soth delivered a lecture at the Museum on Thursday, February 25. The sizable crowd was treated to an eye-opening survey of his incredible career and offered a glimpse into the process of a successful and gracious artist.

Prior to the talk, Alec took a few minutes to tell me the story of Lenny, Minneapolis, a print hanging in our Individual to Icon exhibition. Here’s an image:

Alec Soth, "Lenny, Minneapolis, Minnesota," 2002, c-print, loaned by the artist.

I had a narrative about Lenny constructed in my mind prior to asking Alec to explain it to me. I envisioned Lenny as a bruiser with a soft spot for his mother. Turns out I was way off. Click through to hear Alec discuss the real story.

Alec Soth Talks About ‘Lenny’ (YouTube)

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Alec Soth Talks About ‘Lenny’

January 1, 1970 - to
Alec Soth Talks About ‘Lenny’

Photographer Alec Soth delivered a lecture at the Museum on Thursday, February 25. The sizable crowd was treated to an eye-opening survey of his incredible career and offered a glimpse into the process of a successful and gracious artist.

Prior to the talk, Alec took a few minutes to tell me the story of Lenny, Minneapolis, a print hanging in our Individual to Icon exhibition. Here’s an image:

Alec Soth, "Lenny, Minneapolis, Minnesota," 2002, c-print, loaned by the artist.

I had a narrative about Lenny constructed in my mind prior to asking Alec to explain it to me. I envisioned Lenny as a bruiser with a soft spot for his mother. Turns out I was way off. Click through to hear Alec discuss the real story.

Alec Soth Talks About ‘Lenny’ (YouTube)

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Vote for Your Favorite S.P.A.C.E. Sculpture

January 1, 1970 - to
Vote for Your Favorite S.P.A.C.E. Sculpture

Each year, Plains Art Museum collaborates with one of three campuses in Fargo-Moorhead to produce a work of art for the outdoor sculpture pad adjoining the building. The project, code named S.P.A.C.E. (Sculpture Pad Art Collaborative Experiment), takes proposals from students, features mock ups of the pieces in our atrium, and asks for the public’s vote in deciding which proposal will be finished and placed on the sculpture pad where it will remain through the summer.

This year’s participants are students at Minnesota State University Moorhead and are under the guidance of professor Chris Walla. Their proposals are currently on display and will be up until March 14. Take a look at all five proposals and vote in one of two ways: you can note your favorite in the comments or you can stop by and vote the old-fashioned analog way with a slip of paper.

Here are the nominees. Click on the image to read a brief artist statement.

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