We’re a Best Bet! [Around the Museum]

January 1, 1970 - to
We’re a Best Bet! [Around the Museum]

A big, hearty thank you to all of you who voted for Plains Art Museum in this year’s High Plains Reader Best Bets poll. We were chosen “Best Art Gallery” over some hefty and equally worthwhile competition, including The Rourke, ecce art + yoga, DK Custom Framing, and the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County (the Hjemkomst). And for that, we’re honored.

Congratulations to all of the other winners; they represent some of the finest eats, entertainment and services you can find in our community. You can read up on them in the newest issue of the HPR, on stands and online now.

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We’re a Best Bet! [Around the Museum]

January 1, 1970 - to
We’re a Best Bet! [Around the Museum]

A big, hearty thank you to all of you who voted for Plains Art Museum in this year’s High Plains Reader Best Bets poll. We were chosen “Best Art Gallery” over some hefty and equally worthwhile competition, including The Rourke, ecce art + yoga, DK Custom Framing, and the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County (the Hjemkomst). And for that, we’re honored.

Congratulations to all of the other winners; they represent some of the finest eats, entertainment and services you can find in our community. You can read up on them in the newest issue of the HPR, on stands and online now.

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Summer Art Camps Are Under Way

January 1, 1970 - to
Summer Art Camps Are Under Way

What do Cream of Wheat and fine art have in common? Summer Art Campers are learning this and much more this week at the Wild and Wacky Portraits camp led by art educator Lindsay Palczewski. The campers were inspired by artwork in the Individual to Icon: Portraits of the Famous and Almost Famous from Folk art to Facebook exhibition and created a plethora of self portraits using various media including yarn, clay, and even seeds & beans:

Literary works of art in the form of picture books were also part of the fun. So when the campers learned that Matisse liked to sketch in the art galleries of Paris, the campers decided they wanted to do some gallery sketching as well. “Sometimes I get the best ideas from my students,” Lindsay says. “I like to be flexible and accommodate their suggestions, because when children see their ideas are valued, they are all the more inspired.”

If your child missed Wild and Wacky Portraits, not to worry. Two more art camps are scheduled this summer:

Rock out with Art
July 12-15,
9 am – noon
Camp
Leader: Sarah Dotzenrod
For children going into grades
4-6
The focus will be on self-portraits using the magic of photolithography.

See the Music, Hear the Art
Aug. 16-19,
9 am – noon
Camp
Leader: Marcia Dronen
For children going into grades
3-5
Campers will explore the White Album: Beatles Meet the Plains exhibition and create a symphony of artwork that can be seen and also heard!

And by the way: What does Cream of Wheat and fine art have in common? I’m not telling! But you can visit the Individual to Icon exhibition and check out the artwork of Lillian Colton to find out for yourselves.

To register or find more information about our Summer Art Camps, click here or call 701.232.3821.

Sandy Ben-Haim is the Director of Education for Plains Art Museum. She can be reached via email at sbenhaim@plainsart.org.

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Summer Art Camps Are Under Way

January 1, 1970 - to
Summer Art Camps Are Under Way

What do Cream of Wheat and fine art have in common? Summer Art Campers are learning this and much more this week at the Wild and Wacky Portraits camp led by art educator Lindsay Palczewski. The campers were inspired by artwork in the Individual to Icon: Portraits of the Famous and Almost Famous from Folk art to Facebook exhibition and created a plethora of self portraits using various media including yarn, clay, and even seeds & beans:

Literary works of art in the form of picture books were also part of the fun. So when the campers learned that Matisse liked to sketch in the art galleries of Paris, the campers decided they wanted to do some gallery sketching as well. “Sometimes I get the best ideas from my students,” Lindsay says. “I like to be flexible and accommodate their suggestions, because when children see their ideas are valued, they are all the more inspired.”

If your child missed Wild and Wacky Portraits, not to worry. Two more art camps are scheduled this summer:

Rock out with Art
July 12-15,
9 am – noon
Camp
Leader: Sarah Dotzenrod
For children going into grades
4-6
The focus will be on self-portraits using the magic of photolithography.

See the Music, Hear the Art
Aug. 16-19,
9 am – noon
Camp
Leader: Marcia Dronen
For children going into grades
3-5
Campers will explore the White Album: Beatles Meet the Plains exhibition and create a symphony of artwork that can be seen and also heard!

And by the way: What does Cream of Wheat and fine art have in common? I’m not telling! But you can visit the Individual to Icon exhibition and check out the artwork of Lillian Colton to find out for yourselves.

To register or find more information about our Summer Art Camps, click here or call 701.232.3821.

Sandy Ben-Haim is the Director of Education for Plains Art Museum. She can be reached via email at sbenhaim@plainsart.org.

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Kyja Kristjansson-Nelson Presents ‘A Western Icelander’ at the Spirit Room

January 1, 1970 - to
Kyja Kristjansson-Nelson Presents ‘A Western Icelander’ at the Spirit Room

Kyja Kristjansson-Nelson, Chair of MSUM Film Studies, will present A Western Icelander: Geneographies of Memory and Place, an exhibition in the main gallery of the Spirit Room from June 18 – July 15.  The exhibit will include monotype prints, photographs, and her most recent non-fiction film, Sveit, shot in the Skagafjordur region of Iceland. The exhibit will also include photographs by Christopher Nelson (Walking from Hofsos, Gallery II), and a documentary honoring Bill Holm (Windows of Brimnes, Gallery III) with maps of Iceland.

At 5:00 Friday, June 25th, a free public reception will be held, with a brief talk by Kristjansson and a toast of Icelandic Brennivin. Following the reception, the Hotel Donaldson will have Icelandic appetizers and desserts by chef Anders Ericsson at 6:00pm (ticket required, $15).  The public reception and Hodo event commence the annual Scandinavian Hjemkomst Festival, which features Iceland this year.

Kristjansson’s 30-minute non-fiction film, Sveit, premiered at the Walker Art Center, and also screened at the Athens International Film Festival and the Wisconsin Film FestivalSveit was funded in part by the Bush Foundation, the Corporation of Yaddo, the Fulbright Association, and Skaftfell Menningarmidstod. Sveit was shot in the rural village of Hofsos on the north coast of Iceland. The filmmaker traces her family’s history and emigration from Iceland to the United States, while unpacking memories and stories of her grandfather’s experience as a New American in North Dakota. Meanwhile Kristjansson negotiates the relationship between landscape, language, mythology and ritual with the help of the local 1st – 4th grade Icelandic children.

The Spirit Room is located at 111 Broadway in downtown Fargo 701.237.0230.

This exhibition is funded in part by a grant from the Lake Region Arts Council through a Minnesota State Legislative appropriation.

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Kyja Kristjansson-Nelson Presents ‘A Western Icelander’ at the Spirit Room

January 1, 1970 - to
Kyja Kristjansson-Nelson Presents ‘A Western Icelander’ at the Spirit Room

Kyja Kristjansson-Nelson, Chair of MSUM Film Studies, will present A Western Icelander: Geneographies of Memory and Place, an exhibition in the main gallery of the Spirit Room from June 18 – July 15.  The exhibit will include monotype prints, photographs, and her most recent non-fiction film, Sveit, shot in the Skagafjordur region of Iceland. The exhibit will also include photographs by Christopher Nelson (Walking from Hofsos, Gallery II), and a documentary honoring Bill Holm (Windows of Brimnes, Gallery III) with maps of Iceland.

At 5:00 Friday, June 25th, a free public reception will be held, with a brief talk by Kristjansson and a toast of Icelandic Brennivin. Following the reception, the Hotel Donaldson will have Icelandic appetizers and desserts by chef Anders Ericsson at 6:00pm (ticket required, $15).  The public reception and Hodo event commence the annual Scandinavian Hjemkomst Festival, which features Iceland this year.

Kristjansson’s 30-minute non-fiction film, Sveit, premiered at the Walker Art Center, and also screened at the Athens International Film Festival and the Wisconsin Film FestivalSveit was funded in part by the Bush Foundation, the Corporation of Yaddo, the Fulbright Association, and Skaftfell Menningarmidstod. Sveit was shot in the rural village of Hofsos on the north coast of Iceland. The filmmaker traces her family’s history and emigration from Iceland to the United States, while unpacking memories and stories of her grandfather’s experience as a New American in North Dakota. Meanwhile Kristjansson negotiates the relationship between landscape, language, mythology and ritual with the help of the local 1st – 4th grade Icelandic children.

The Spirit Room is located at 111 Broadway in downtown Fargo 701.237.0230.

This exhibition is funded in part by a grant from the Lake Region Arts Council through a Minnesota State Legislative appropriation.

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Bikes, The Beatles and Summer Art Camps

January 1, 1970 - to
Bikes, The Beatles and Summer Art Camps

The week that was.

We close another week at Plains Art Museum as heavy showers fall in downtown Fargo. Earlier in the week we also experienced a heavy downpour of seeds from the huge cottonwood tree across the street. This “summer snow” is fun to look at but as I learned from Steve, our facility maintenance coordinator, the seeds also clog up our condensers which then require frequent cleaning. They’re a double-edged sword, I guess.

This past week we began putting final touches on the plans for Bikes, Art and Community Health Week coming up in late August. We are thrilled to be partnering with the FM Community Bike Workshop and Great Northern Bicycle Co. in this week of free events that focus on pedal power and collaborative art, providing a solid lead-in to Fargo-Moorhead’s Streets Alive! celebration. I’m most excited for the people-powered bike-in movie theatre. Volunteers will pedal a five-person bike (named “The Mighty Quinn,” see below), turning a generator which will then power a projector showing the film The Triplets of Bellville. Besides being a spectacle, it will also be an opportunity to enjoy a delightful movie in the open air.

The Mighty Quinn

The Mighty Quinn

Also, in case you missed it, The Forum’s John Lamb conducted an interview with Museum Director Colleen Sheehy on the state of the Museum during our downturn economy. It’s a worthwhile read.

The week that will be.

Next week, expect to see some photos and reaction from our first Summer Art Camp of the year. This first of three art camps is designed for children going into grades 1 through 4 and will focus on using mixed media to create self portraits. Open slots are still available by calling 701.232.3821 or by signing up on our Learn page.

Also, we’ll be formally kicking off our White Album exhibition with an opening reception next Wednesday starting at 5:30. In addition to the exhibition, local heavy Michael Pink will bring a Beatles-esque sound to our Rush Hour Music stage. Hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar will be available and the exhibition curators will be on hand for a gallery talk as well. We expect a fun-filled evening celebrating this thought-provoking take on where popular culture/music and visual art … ahem … come together.

Until then, have a great weekend and remember that the Museum offers free admission every Thursday through Labor Day, so make plans to visit.

View Event

Bikes, The Beatles and Summer Art Camps

January 1, 1970 - to
Bikes, The Beatles and Summer Art Camps

The week that was.

We close another week at Plains Art Museum as heavy showers fall in downtown Fargo. Earlier in the week we also experienced a heavy downpour of seeds from the huge cottonwood tree across the street. This “summer snow” is fun to look at but as I learned from Steve, our facility maintenance coordinator, the seeds also clog up our condensers which then require frequent cleaning. They’re a double-edged sword, I guess.

This past week we began putting final touches on the plans for Bikes, Art and Community Health Week coming up in late August. We are thrilled to be partnering with the FM Community Bike Workshop and Great Northern Bicycle Co. in this week of free events that focus on pedal power and collaborative art, providing a solid lead-in to Fargo-Moorhead’s Streets Alive! celebration. I’m most excited for the people-powered bike-in movie theatre. Volunteers will pedal a five-person bike (named “The Mighty Quinn,” see below), turning a generator which will then power a projector showing the film The Triplets of Bellville. Besides being a spectacle, it will also be an opportunity to enjoy a delightful movie in the open air.

The Mighty Quinn

The Mighty Quinn

Also, in case you missed it, The Forum’s John Lamb conducted an interview with Museum Director Colleen Sheehy on the state of the Museum during our downturn economy. It’s a worthwhile read.

The week that will be.

Next week, expect to see some photos and reaction from our first Summer Art Camp of the year. This first of three art camps is designed for children going into grades 1 through 4 and will focus on using mixed media to create self portraits. Open slots are still available by calling 701.232.3821 or by signing up on our Learn page.

Also, we’ll be formally kicking off our White Album exhibition with an opening reception next Wednesday starting at 5:30. In addition to the exhibition, local heavy Michael Pink will bring a Beatles-esque sound to our Rush Hour Music stage. Hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar will be available and the exhibition curators will be on hand for a gallery talk as well. We expect a fun-filled evening celebrating this thought-provoking take on where popular culture/music and visual art … ahem … come together.

Until then, have a great weekend and remember that the Museum offers free admission every Thursday through Labor Day, so make plans to visit.

View Event

“Landmark” Exhibition Reaches into the FM Community

January 1, 1970 - to
“Landmark” Exhibition Reaches into the FM Community

"In Reflection," Britta Trygstad

"In Reflection," Britta Trygstad

This week, we opened an ArtView exhibition entitled Landmark: Views of the Moorhead Power Plant. The exhibition aims to get us to really look at and appreciate the architecture and historical memory that the Moorhead Power Plant, even though it is defunct, can still provide us. Further, the show asks the community to consider the fate of this building as its future is largely uncertain. Viewers can leave their ideas for the building’s possible re-use in the comment book with the exhibition or write your ideas here.  The work of seven artists was selected after a call for submissions: Janet Flom, Juliet Hanratty, Ann Arbor Miller, George Pfeifer, Richard Skauge, Gin Templeton, and Britta Trygstad.

The Landmark exhibition is an example of how Plains Art Museum is reaching outside of its walls to bring art and artists to audiences in our public spaces and to consider the aesthetics of our community life. Our Defiant Gardens project is an ongoing effort to create gardens and public sculpture as gathering places that will help to sustain and revive public spaces, and our Plains Inside Out series of programming asks the public to “see the art” in activities like bicycling and aerosol mural painting.  Reaching out to the public and asking them to consider new kinds of art making, often with a social component,  is the newest direction of public engagement for museums around the country. Being located as we are in a growing and dynamic community, the same holds true for us.

We believe that art provides openings for conversations and socializing, bringing people together to appreciate experience and to reflect on our lives and places. We invite you to join us in these opportunities. Please let us know about your ideas for having Plains Art Museum interact with the community in the comments, or stop on by.

(Image: Britta Trygstad, In Reflection, 2010, digital photo print, 11 x 17″, loaned by the artist.)

View Event

“Landmark” Exhibition Reaches into the FM Community

January 1, 1970 - to
“Landmark” Exhibition Reaches into the FM Community

"In Reflection," Britta Trygstad

"In Reflection," Britta Trygstad

This week, we opened an ArtView exhibition entitled Landmark: Views of the Moorhead Power Plant. The exhibition aims to get us to really look at and appreciate the architecture and historical memory that the Moorhead Power Plant, even though it is defunct, can still provide us. Further, the show asks the community to consider the fate of this building as its future is largely uncertain. Viewers can leave their ideas for the building’s possible re-use in the comment book with the exhibition or write your ideas here.  The work of seven artists was selected after a call for submissions: Janet Flom, Juliet Hanratty, Ann Arbor Miller, George Pfeifer, Richard Skauge, Gin Templeton, and Britta Trygstad.

The Landmark exhibition is an example of how Plains Art Museum is reaching outside of its walls to bring art and artists to audiences in our public spaces and to consider the aesthetics of our community life. Our Defiant Gardens project is an ongoing effort to create gardens and public sculpture as gathering places that will help to sustain and revive public spaces, and our Plains Inside Out series of programming asks the public to “see the art” in activities like bicycling and aerosol mural painting.  Reaching out to the public and asking them to consider new kinds of art making, often with a social component,  is the newest direction of public engagement for museums around the country. Being located as we are in a growing and dynamic community, the same holds true for us.

We believe that art provides openings for conversations and socializing, bringing people together to appreciate experience and to reflect on our lives and places. We invite you to join us in these opportunities. Please let us know about your ideas for having Plains Art Museum interact with the community in the comments, or stop on by.

(Image: Britta Trygstad, In Reflection, 2010, digital photo print, 11 x 17″, loaned by the artist.)

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