This Weekend: The FMVA Studio Crawl

January 1, 1970 - to
This Weekend: The FMVA Studio Crawl

The FMVA Studio Crawl gets started this Saturday throughout Fargo-Moorhead (see some previous posts about the Crawl, and the preview exhibition currently showing at the Museum, here and here). Glassblower, Studio Crawl organizer, and all-around good guy Jon Offut took some time recently to answer a few quick questions about the Crawl. In addition to the brochures Jon mentions, you can also find Studio Crawl maps at www.fmva.us. Get out and enjoy it!

1. This is the seventh year of the Studio Crawl. How has it grown or changed over that time?

The first Studio Crawl had 27 studios to visit. This year there are 39, with over 50 artists participating. Each year some artists go on sabbatical, some return, and new artists are accepted. So there are always new studios to visit and at all of the studios artists are presenting their newest work. Every year we are adding more and more evening events. This year, as well as the Studio Crawl preview at the Plains, there is a group show at the Spirit Room with a reception Saturday, October 2, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The FMVA also presented the Big Show at the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County (the Hjemkomst).

2. Are there any new artists this year who you are excited about? Is there any new work by established artists that excites you?

This week I visited the studio of landscape artist Robert Crowe and saw some very interesting work utilizing nontraditional applications of pastel.   Eric Syvertson is new to crawl this year,  he creates realistic contemporary drawings using experimental mixtures of techniques and mediums. His first solo show is this fall at the Rourke Gallery in Moorhead.

3. What advice would you give to a first-time Studio Crawler?

Don’t try to see it all! Visit the Plains Art Museum and pick up a brochure, then visit the preview exhibit on display and select the artists that interest you to visit.

4. In addition to showcasing art and artists, how has the Studio Crawl progressed as a social event and get-together?

It has really helped the local arts community come together and start to operate as a group. I also hear stories every year of how our visitors are utilizing the event. Last year a woman introduced herself to me and said she was from Minot and had driven down to meet her sister, who had flown in from Indiana, for a “girls’ weekend.”

5. What value do you see the Studio Crawl bringing to the arts community in Fargo-Moorhead?

As a free “in your neighborhood” event we draw a lot of visitors that don’t normally participate in visual arts events and give them an introduction to the art scene. Much of our publicity is focused on underserved audiences.

The brochure and the preview exhibit at the Plains Art Museum both serve to illustrate the quantity and quality of visual art in the Fargo Morehead region. 25,000 of the brochures are printed, 10,000 of them are direct mailed to the region and many more are sent to former North Dakotans who still maintain ties to the area.

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The Fred Scheel Opening Reception

January 1, 1970 - to
The Fred Scheel Opening Reception

Here are a few photos from last week’s opening reception for The Frederick B. Scheel Photography Collection: A New Gift to the Plains courtesy of Britta Trygstad at Milestones Photography.

Museum Director and CEO Colleen Sheehy expressing her thanks to the Fred Scheel and the Scheel family for the donation of 266 photographic prints to the Museum’s permanent collection:

Christian Peterson, associate curator of photographs at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, discussed the Scheel’s work as well as the work of Fred Scheel’s influences and mentors:

And, there were tasty desserts:

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The Fred Scheel Opening Reception

January 1, 1970 - to
The Fred Scheel Opening Reception

Here are a few photos from last week’s opening reception for The Frederick B. Scheel Photography Collection: A New Gift to the Plains courtesy of Britta Trygstad at Milestones Photography.

Museum Director and CEO Colleen Sheehy expressing her thanks to the Fred Scheel and the Scheel family for the donation of 266 photographic prints to the Museum’s permanent collection:

Christian Peterson, associate curator of photographs at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, discussed the Scheel’s work as well as the work of Fred Scheel’s influences and mentors:

And, there were tasty desserts:

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Planting Ideas: Design Proposals for a Moorhead Power Plant Defiant Garden

January 1, 1970 - to
Planting Ideas: Design Proposals for a Moorhead Power Plant Defiant Garden

Moorhead Power Plant - Britta TrygstadTuesday, September 28
6:30 p.m.
Moorhead City Council Chambers – 500 Center Ave, Moorhead

Back in July, artists Rob Fischer and Kevin Johnson got acquainted with community members in the Woodlawn neighborahood of Moorhead and listened to their input for a future public art project – a Defiant Garden – at the Moorhead Power Plant site.

Fischer and Johnson will return with proposed ideas to implement at the site and would appreciate your involvement, opinions and ideas. Community members, neighbors and gardening enthusiasts are urged to attend and all members of the public are welcome.

Defiant Gardens is an ongoing project working with artists, landscape historians, landscape architects, writers, curators, and city planners to develop public art projects that inspire the community.

The project at the Moorhead Power Plant is supported by a generous grant from the Lake Region Arts Council with contributions from the Minnesota arts and cultural heritage fund as appropriated by the Minnesota State Legislature with money from the vote of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008.

Image: Britta Trygstad, Reflection #2, digital photograph, 2010.

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VORE, Scheel, Rosenquist, Crawl

January 1, 1970 - to
VORE, Scheel, Rosenquist, Crawl

The week that was

We’ve been full of hustle and bustle at the PAM offices for the last several weeks. On September 10, we opened Andrea Carlson: VORE, a stunning collection of mixed-media images chock full of animal imagery and horror-movie taglines. This is the debut of this new series by Carlson, an artist currently living in the Twin Cities, and we’re excited to be featuring this exhibition in the William and Anna Jane Schlossman Gallery on the 3rd floor. Keep an eye on the blog: a Q&A with Carlson will appear soon.

Last night, we held the opening reception for The Frederick B. Scheel Photography collection: A New Gift to the Plains, which opened on September 17. Despite the lousy weather and a busy arts calendar, we had a fantastic turnout. There were plenty of photographers and photography fans in attendance, and all received this new donation from the Scheel family warmly. Christian Peterson, associate curator of photographs at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, gave a presentation outlining the background of Fred Scheel’s numerous influences and acquaintances, many of them famous photographers whose prints were included in the donation. A walk through this show will either confirm or ignite your love for the quickly vanishing silver gelatin print – the quality of contrast between the dark blacks and the brilliant whites shown in these prints is breathtaking. This show is a must-see for any fan of photography.

The week that will be

As if things couldn’t get any more exciting: next week, we will begin installing The North Dakota Mural on the north wall of the Landfield Atrium. If you’re unfamiliar with the saga of the mural, we’ll be posting some background on the story of the mural and its creator, Pop Art luminary and North Dakota native James Rosenquist, in the next couple weeks. If you’re familiar with the story, you know that the acquisition and hanging of a large-scale Rosenquist piece has been a major goal of Plains Art Museum for a long, long time. In fact, it fulfills a major leg of our There’s a Little Artist in All of Us campaign.

Our tagline with the debut of the mural, coming up on Thursday, October 7 at 11 a.m., has been “What’s the Big Deal?” We say this because the answer is “this work of art,” a 13 x 24 ft. mural with many of the traits audiences have admired in Rosenquist’s work over the span of his long career: sharply juxtaposed collage, manipulation of scale, and a strong representation of the fixtures of social and political life. Further, and most importantly, the mural will spur a number of narratives about our state and will give North Dakota an outstanding signature work of art to represent her. Due to the size of the piece, the process of hanging it will take a few days and require the assistance of specialists who work exclusively in exhibiting large works of art. Check back to the blog over the next week or so for a more detailed look at this process.

Last, but certainly not least: we’re also gearing up for the FMVA Studio Crawl taking place all over the Fargo-Moorhead area next Saturday and Sunday, October 2 and 3 (click through to the FMVA website for details and a map). This is a marvelous opportunity for art fans to sneak a peek at a number of our local artists in their natural habitats – their studios. The Studio Crawl has also become a big social happening over its six years of existence with a number of events taking place on the periphery. Among them is our Studio Crawl Preview show, now on display on the 2nd floor of the Museum. The Preview will be up through October 10.

Question

Did you attend the opening of the Fred Scheel exhibition? What was your impression?

View Event

VORE, Scheel, Rosenquist, Crawl

January 1, 1970 - to
VORE, Scheel, Rosenquist, Crawl

The week that was

We’ve been full of hustle and bustle at the PAM offices for the last several weeks. On September 10, we opened Andrea Carlson: VORE, a stunning collection of mixed-media images chock full of animal imagery and horror-movie taglines. This is the debut of this new series by Carlson, an artist currently living in the Twin Cities, and we’re excited to be featuring this exhibition in the William and Anna Jane Schlossman Gallery on the 3rd floor. Keep an eye on the blog: a Q&A with Carlson will appear soon.

Last night, we held the opening reception for The Frederick B. Scheel Photography collection: A New Gift to the Plains, which opened on September 17. Despite the lousy weather and a busy arts calendar, we had a fantastic turnout. There were plenty of photographers and photography fans in attendance, and all received this new donation from the Scheel family warmly. Christian Peterson, associate curator of photographs at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, gave a presentation outlining the background of Fred Scheel’s numerous influences and acquaintances, many of them famous photographers whose prints were included in the donation. A walk through this show will either confirm or ignite your love for the quickly vanishing silver gelatin print – the quality of contrast between the dark blacks and the brilliant whites shown in these prints is breathtaking. This show is a must-see for any fan of photography.

The week that will be

As if things couldn’t get any more exciting: next week, we will begin installing The North Dakota Mural on the north wall of the Landfield Atrium. If you’re unfamiliar with the saga of the mural, we’ll be posting some background on the story of the mural and its creator, Pop Art luminary and North Dakota native James Rosenquist, in the next couple weeks. If you’re familiar with the story, you know that the acquisition and hanging of a large-scale Rosenquist piece has been a major goal of Plains Art Museum for a long, long time. In fact, it fulfills a major leg of our There’s a Little Artist in All of Us campaign.

Our tagline with the debut of the mural, coming up on Thursday, October 7 at 11 a.m., has been “What’s the Big Deal?” We say this because the answer is “this work of art,” a 13 x 24 ft. mural with many of the traits audiences have admired in Rosenquist’s work over the span of his long career: sharply juxtaposed collage, manipulation of scale, and a strong representation of the fixtures of social and political life. Further, and most importantly, the mural will spur a number of narratives about our state and will give North Dakota an outstanding signature work of art to represent her. Due to the size of the piece, the process of hanging it will take a few days and require the assistance of specialists who work exclusively in exhibiting large works of art. Check back to the blog over the next week or so for a more detailed look at this process.

Last, but certainly not least: we’re also gearing up for the FMVA Studio Crawl taking place all over the Fargo-Moorhead area next Saturday and Sunday, October 2 and 3 (click through to the FMVA website for details and a map). This is a marvelous opportunity for art fans to sneak a peek at a number of our local artists in their natural habitats – their studios. The Studio Crawl has also become a big social happening over its six years of existence with a number of events taking place on the periphery. Among them is our Studio Crawl Preview show, now on display on the 2nd floor of the Museum. The Preview will be up through October 10.

Question

Did you attend the opening of the Fred Scheel exhibition? What was your impression?

View Event

Studio Crawl Preview, Pt. 2

January 1, 1970 - to
Studio Crawl Preview, Pt. 2

Here are a few more images from the Studio Crawl Preview currently showing on the 2nd floor of the Museum. Stop up and see the rest of the show featuring work by artists involved with the Fargo-Moorhead Visual Artists (FMVA) Studio Crawl coming up on October 2 and 3. The preview will remain up through October 10.

View Event

Studio Crawl Preview, Pt. 2

January 1, 1970 - to
Studio Crawl Preview, Pt. 2

Here are a few more images from the Studio Crawl Preview currently showing on the 2nd floor of the Museum. Stop up and see the rest of the show featuring work by artists involved with the Fargo-Moorhead Visual Artists (FMVA) Studio Crawl coming up on October 2 and 3. The preview will remain up through October 10.

View Event

The Studio Crawl Preview

January 1, 1970 - to
The Studio Crawl Preview

The Fargo-Moorhead Visual Artists’ (FMVA) Studio Crawl will take place on October 2 and 3. This annual event, now in its sixth year, offers its audience a peek behind the curtain of the creative process by asking artists to open up their studio spaces for displays, demonstrations, and sales. Additionally, the Studio Crawl has become a social affair with a number of related events surrounding it and creating a celebratory atmosphere geared around visual arts. It’s a good time with a bunch of artists, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

In anticipation of the Studio Crawl, we’re featuring a number of the Studio Crawl artists in our Studio Crawl Preview exhibition showing now through October 10 in the Xcel Energy and Serkland Law Firm Galleries on the second floor. Overall, a wide array of media relate the fact that there are plenty of talented artists at work in the community drawing influence from everywhere.

Here are a few of the pieces being shown in the Studio Crawl Preview. We’ll post a few more next week. In the meantime, stop by and see them in person.

View Event

The Studio Crawl Preview

January 1, 1970 - to
The Studio Crawl Preview

The Fargo-Moorhead Visual Artists’ (FMVA) Studio Crawl will take place on October 2 and 3. This annual event, now in its sixth year, offers its audience a peek behind the curtain of the creative process by asking artists to open up their studio spaces for displays, demonstrations, and sales. Additionally, the Studio Crawl has become a social affair with a number of related events surrounding it and creating a celebratory atmosphere geared around visual arts. It’s a good time with a bunch of artists, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

In anticipation of the Studio Crawl, we’re featuring a number of the Studio Crawl artists in our Studio Crawl Preview exhibition showing now through October 10 in the Xcel Energy and Serkland Law Firm Galleries on the second floor. Overall, a wide array of media relate the fact that there are plenty of talented artists at work in the community drawing influence from everywhere.

Here are a few of the pieces being shown in the Studio Crawl Preview. We’ll post a few more next week. In the meantime, stop by and see them in person.

View Event