Kids Get Into Mask-Making Action

January 1, 1970 - to
Kids Get Into Mask-Making Action

The excitement is building for our 15th Annual Spring Gala, “Masterpiece Masquerade,” to be held on May 7. Tickets are selling fast and we’re expecting a superb evening of masks, costumes, and the celebration of art, all to help benefit our arts education programs.

In anticipation of this evening, we asked the kids at our last Kid Quest event to help us out with the decorations for Gala night . As you can see from the photos below, their response was outstanding. Several dozen of these designs will be hung around the Museum to set the mood for a really fun masquerade party.

If you’re planning on attending the Gala, consider making your own mask (if you choose to wear one … you don’t have to). You’ll get the opportunity to flex your creative muscle and you’ll end up with a look for Gala night that will be all your own.

Are you excited for Gala night? What are your plans for a mask/costume?

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School Spirit Banner

January 1, 1970 - to
School Spirit Banner

Last fall, fourth and fifth graders from Ellen Hopkins Elementary School toured the Museum while studying the work of James Rosenquist. Taken with the idea that Rosenquist was once a billboard painter, they set to work with a plan to create a large-scale piece of their own. They used the National Art Education Association’s slogan “You gotta have ART,” and symbols representing North Dakota much like Rosenquist did for The North Dakota Mural.

The mural is comprised of 27 separate panels and, at about 18 feet long and eight feet high, it is the largest work currently hanging in the Museum aside from The North Dakota Mural. Each star was placed by a student who worked on the mural. It will hang on the south wall of the third floor during Sunday’s Youth Art Month reception.

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The Birdhouse Project

January 1, 1970 - to
The Birdhouse Project

This week, it’s architecture for the birds.

Through Thursday, stop by the atrium to see theĀ  creations of second-year NDSU architecture students. Each student began their design by studying the work of a different Pritzker-award winning architect, then adapted that design philosophy to the needs of their “client,” a certain species of bird or bat.

They truly are a sight. Along with their novel look and construction, the birdhouses are quite a learning tool. Viewers learn about specific architects and their designs, they get to learn how different species of birds interact with their environments, and they get a glimpse into the architectural process by seeing how the student architects brought all of these notions together into their designs.

While you’re here, vote for your favorite. The birdhouse getting the most votes wins a “people’s choice” award.

(Click the photos below to enlarge and learn more about their design.)

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