Architecturally inspired birdhouses flock to the Museum

January 1, 1970 - to
Architecturally inspired birdhouses flock to the Museum

Birdhouses of a slightly different feather will be on display in the Museum atrium through April 1. The houses, created by architecture students at North Dakota State University, are part of an annual project called “Architecture for the Birds.” Students randomly choose a Pritzker-Prize winning architect and a species of bird or bat, then set to work on creating a work in the style of that architect that will suit that particular species. The resulting works offer a glimpse into the design and build process vital to the development of a budding architect–plus, they’re a lot of fun to look at. Stop in for a birds-eye view.

This project is overseen by Joan Vorderbruggen, assistant professor of architecture at NDSU.

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The construction launch for the Center for Creativity

January 1, 1970 - to
The construction launch for the Center for Creativity

Museum Director Colleen Sheehy speaks in front of Museum supporters at the construction launch ceremony for the Katherine Kilbourne Burgum Center for Creativity. Photo by Britta Trygstad.

We had a gorgeous spring morning today, a perfect setting for a formal launch of construction activities at the future Katherine Kilbourne Burgum Center for Creativity.

Before a group of approximately 100 donors and supporters, Museum Director Colleen Sheehy praised the support of foundations, individuals, and the community as a whole that went into our fund raising campaign, “There’s a Little Artist in All of Us.” Fargo Public Schools Superintendent Rick Buresh complimented the partnership between the school district and the Museum, noting that arts education lends an advantage to our nation’s children that leads to innovation. Museum board chair Arlette Preston thanked area donors, including the Katherine Kilbourne Burgum Trust, the foundation whose donation-coupled with a challenge grant from the Burgum family-provided the final funding push to begin construction on the Center. And, area philanthropist Doug Burgum stressed the impact of creativity on the economic vitality of our region.

On top of that, we unveiled a super-sweet construction sign that will sit in the window of the future Center, a sign that got some color thanks to a group of fourth graders from Kennedy Elementary School:

Photo by Britta Trygstad

You’ll see the sign hanging in the windows facing 1st Avenue North sometime soon.

Construction is now in full swing over at the Center and will continue through the summer. A grand opening celebration is planned for Sunday, September 30, with a season of special events and programming in the works to kick off its inaugural year. Keep an eye on this blog for updates on the construction process and to learn more about this wonderful community asset.

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Our apologies for our phone gremlins

January 1, 1970 - to
Our apologies for our phone gremlins

If you’ve tried calling the Museum any time over the last week or so, you may have had a long hold time or you weren’t connected to your intended contact in a timely manner. We’re having some problems with our phones and we apologize for any difficulties you may have had.

Also, we blame gremlins (not this kind, the other kind).

We’re currently transitioning to a new phone system, a process that may take up to 30 days. In the meantime, we ask you to do the following:

Be patient. If your call is lost, please wait a couple minutes and call us back. If you experience long hold times, please hang up and try again.

Try email. If you’re trying to reach a specific member of the Museum staff, you can find their email over at our contact us page. If you’re not sure where to direct your email, you can use our general email address, museum@plainsart.org.

Don’t feed any Museum staffers after midnight. We don’t need this thing getting any worse.

Thanks again for your patience.

(Photo: greatvectors.com through a Creative Commons license)

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The Doodle 4 Google deadline is approaching

January 1, 1970 - to
The Doodle 4 Google deadline is approaching

I case you’ve missed it over the last few weeks in our weekly email newsletter, the Museum is currently partnering with Google in the program Doodle 4 Google. It works like this: your child (or, children, since it makes a great class project) creates a design for the Google home page “doodle” that is entered into a contest with other designs from around the country. Ten finalists will be chosen from North Dakota for an exhibition at the Museum … and one grand prize winner, chosen out of all submissions, will win a $30,000 college scholarship, a $50,000 technology grant for their school, plus a bunch of other goodies.

The theme for this year’s Doodle 4 Google contest is “If I could travel in time, I’d visit…”, inviting young creators to imagine another time in history and respond artistically. From our standpoint, this is a wonderful challenge: we appreciate the way art can lend context to a child’s development and encourage the critical thinking skills that become so important as we age.

All submissions must be postmarked by March 23. You can read up on details and download an entry form over at google.com/doodle4google. Now, get doodling!

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