Fargo-Moorhead: we want to hear your flood stories

January 1, 1970 - to
Fargo-Moorhead: we want to hear your flood stories

Krinke, second from left, is working with West Fargo High School students under the direction of Eric Syvertson, left.

Sandbagging lines. Rising basement water. Price gouging for drain plugs. Bailing out a worried neighbor. The horror of having a sump pump breakdown.

All of us in the Fargo-Moorhead area have these stories from the past few years of Red River Valley flooding. They are a significant part of our shared history and surround an issue that continues to push buttons to this day. They also connect us in a way unique from that of your average community, and many of these stories illustrate those connections.

These narratives are the focal point of artist Rebecca Krinke’s project Flood Stories. Krinke, who teaches landscape architecture at the University of Minnesota, is collecting these stories as part of our PROJECT Flood Diversion series, and they will be read and displayed during a walk and reception event on Saturday, April 28, at 1 p.m. The walk starts at Dike West and will make its way to the Museum.

Do you have a flood story you’d like to share? They can be any length, and feel free to include text, audio, video, or photos. You can leave them, here, in the comments, post them to our Facebook page, tag us in a tweet, or email them to Rebecca Krinke at rjkrinke@umn.edu. Then, come out for the walk on the 28th to hear the stories of others.

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Andrea Stanislav and Dean Lozow’s “Reflect”

January 1, 1970 - to
Andrea Stanislav and Dean Lozow’s “Reflect”

This past weekend, Andrea Stanislav and Dean Lozow presented the transactional walking performance piece Reflect throughout Fargo-Moorhead this past weekend. You’d know if you saw them: they were dressed head to toe in silver outfits covered with small mirror buttons. On Friday and Saturday, they walked through downtown Fargo, through the student unions, and in and out of bars and galleries. While walking, they distributed the buttons in exchange for a photo from the recipient and a story. In particular, they were listening to stories about the issue of flooding in the Red River Valley, taking note of the ways in which the issue has defined our community by strengthening relationships.

Andrea and Dean then took the photos they took and made new buttons, each with the face of a mirror button recipient. Then, they again walked through Fargo-Moorhead, distributing the photo buttons to create a large-scale, yet intimate, shared community portrait of  Fargo-Moorhead.

You can see a video of Andrea and Dean explaining Reflect here.

Reflect is a part of PROJECT Flood Diversion, a series of art projects whose purpose is to inspire discussion and encourage contemplation on the phenomenon of flooding in the Red River Valley.

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Stevie Famulari’s garden fashion

January 1, 1970 - to
Stevie Famulari’s garden fashion

Artist and NDSU landscape architecture professor Stevie Famulari (left, with intern Courtney Valen) puts the finishing touches on a long coat with from living greenery. The coat is completely wearable, and it will continue to grow, flower, and reseed itself over the course of time. The coat is one of five pieces Famulari is creating for The Green Line Series, a collection of garments made with like materials. One is on display as of today, and the others will be added just prior to our Spring Gala on May 5. The complete collection will be on display until May 28.

Famulari and her green fashion was featured last night on WDAY; you can find that here.

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“Dakota Horizons” by Jon Offutt

January 1, 1970 - to
“Dakota Horizons” by Jon Offutt

Yesterday, the bright morning sun was pouring through the windows by our alcove on the second floor. And it caught these works, new glass pieces by Jon Offutt, just right, filling them with light for an undeniably cool effect.

It’s perfectly fitting for these works, too. Created as a multi-work installation, an important element of this new series is Offutt’s channeling of light, transparency of atmosphere, and the creation of depth found on the distant horizon. To accomplish this effect, Offutt added layers of glass powders that are rolled on to the hot glass surface. He then added the rolling prairie as a separate component, then inflated and shaped the vessel. “This collection enables me to present the prairie landscapes on a larger scale — a scale suitable for the massive prairie landscape that surrounds us.”

The installation, entitled Dakota Horizons, will remain on display through August 19.

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Snack-sized skyscrapers

January 1, 1970 - to
Snack-sized skyscrapers

Yesterday, after two weeks with the Architecture for the Birds exhibition by NDSU architecture students, our atrium again became temporary home to some small-scale architectural wonders. Fifty Popsicle stick towers–created by second-year ALA students in NDSU’s architecture department, will be on display through April 10.

This short exhibition is the result of a unique challenge given to these studetns each year: constructing a tower entirely from Popsicle sticks that is equal to their own height. The results are meant to teach the students to mimic the balancing act that goes into the creation of a skyscraper, learning a valuable lesson in design and construction in the process. For the rest of us, the towers are a welcome bit of eye candy for the Atrium.

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