students

Community Print Exchange Connects University Printmakers

January 1, 1970 - to
Community Print Exchange Connects University Printmakers

Plains Art Museum presents Community on April 11 from 2 to 4 p.m., a print exchange organized by artist Amanda Heidt, manager of the Museum’s Hannaher’s, Inc. Print Studio. For the exchange, university-based artists will create and submit an edition of 30 prints on the theme “community” and will receive prints from other artists in return.

This event is free and open to the public.

Participants include faculty and students from Concordia College, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Minot State University, North Dakota State University, University of Manitoba, University of North Dakota, and Valley City State University. One print from each edition will be given to these institutions and also will be displayed at the Museum from April 3 – 30.

 

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Scholastic Art and Writing Awards gains North Dakota affiliate to recognize state’s creative teens

January 1, 1970 - to
Scholastic Art and Writing Awards gains North Dakota affiliate to recognize state’s creative teens

North Dakota teens with talents in the visual and literary arts have a new advantage in the 2015 Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, now in its 92nd year. For the first time in the history of the contest, North Dakota entries will be judged on a state basis rather than in a multi-state regional competition.

callartistThe newly formed North Dakota affiliate of the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers is a partnership between the Red River Valley Writing Project at North Dakota State University and Plains Art Museum, both based in Fargo.

“This allows us to have in-state judging and a state awards ceremony for North Dakota teens who participate,” said Kelly Sassi, director of the Red River Valley Writing Project and associate professor of English and education at NDSU. “There were only about 20 entries from the entire state of North Dakota for these awards last year. With $10 million in scholarship awards available at the national level, we feel strongly that more North Dakota students should have the opportunity to compete for these awards.”

The 2015 deadline for submissions is Dec. 17, 2014. Details of the art and writing categories, and entry and submission requirements, are available at www.artandwriting.org. Questions about the North Dakota judging may be directed to Olivia Edwardson, state coordinator, at oedwardson@west-fargo.k12.nd.us.

A ceremony to recognize all North Dakota winners, as well as an exhibition of visual art winners, will be held at Plains Art Museum on Feb. 17, 2015. Gold-level winners by state will move on to the national competition.

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards were started in 1923 by Scholastic founder Maurice Robinson. They are the nation’s highest honor and largest source of scholarships for creative teenagers.

In partnership with more than 100 local affiliate organizations, the 2014 Scholastic Awards received 255,000 submissions across 28 art and writing categories. Notable Scholastic Awards alumni include Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Joyce Carol Oates, Ken Burns, Sylvia Plath, Robert Redford, Stephen King, Lena Dunham and many more.

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Curator Elizabeth Armstrong to speak on Andy Warhol

January 1, 1970 - to
Curator Elizabeth Armstrong to speak on Andy Warhol

Elizabeth Armstrong, Curator of Contemporary Art / Director of the Center for Alternative Museum Practice (CAMP) at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA) will discuss “Warhol’s Icons: The Artist’s Search for Reality” on Thursday, April 11 from 7 – 9 PM at MSUM King Hall, Room 110.

For Andy Warhol, wandering the aisles of a supermarket was a voyage in reality far more exciting than looking at contemporary art. Today, as viewers of “The Colbert Report” know, we are living in an age of “truthiness,” in which the relationship between reality and fiction has never been murkier. When did we begin to notice that replicas or artifacts of things were more exciting than the actual things they represented? How did it happen that more people now tune in to fake news shows to get their real news?

Curator Elizabeth Armstrong will explore our shifting experience and understanding of reality through the brilliant artifice of Andy Warhol and the lens of international artists working today. Drawing from her MIA exhibition More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness, Armstrong will explore notions of simulation, truthiness, deception, play, and how artists (and she includes Stephen Colbert in this category), help us navigate the growing slippage in our culture between reality and make believe. This project is supported in part by the MSUM Department of Art & Design Colloquium Lecture Series.

WHO: Elizabeth Armstrong, Curator of Contemporary Art / Director of CAMP at MIA

WHAT: “Warhol’s Icons: The Artist’s Search for Reality”

WHEN: Thursday, April 11 from 7 – 9 PM

WHERE: MSUM King Hall, Room 110

COST: Free and open to the public

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Youth Art Month Celebration

January 1, 1970 - to
Youth Art Month Celebration

The Museum was filled with enthusiastic youth artists this past Sunday as the Plains Art Museum celebrated the 11th annual School Spirit: Celebrating Youth Art Month Reception, exhibiting works from approximately 350 regional K-12 student artists. With approximately 750 people attending the reception, guests enjoyed viewing the art, listening to the fabulous F-M Youth Symphony Orchestra, and browsing the Museum’s exhibitions.

Jackson, a student at Kennedy Elementary, is a very proud exhibitor and was extremely excited to see his artwork in the Museum, according to Sandy Ben-Haim, Plains Art Museum Director of Education. The School Spirit Reception was his second time at the Museum with his mom to view his art, as he visited in early March for Kids Quest.

Youth Art Month is celebrated for the month of March and the Museum will display the student artist’s work through the end of the month. Stop in to see the creativity of these young artists and to visit the rest of the Museum exhibits!

Written by Savanna, Communications Intern

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School Spirit Banner

January 1, 1970 - to
School Spirit Banner

Last fall, fourth and fifth graders from Ellen Hopkins Elementary School toured the Museum while studying the work of James Rosenquist. Taken with the idea that Rosenquist was once a billboard painter, they set to work with a plan to create a large-scale piece of their own. They used the National Art Education Association’s slogan “You gotta have ART,” and symbols representing North Dakota much like Rosenquist did for The North Dakota Mural.

The mural is comprised of 27 separate panels and, at about 18 feet long and eight feet high, it is the largest work currently hanging in the Museum aside from The North Dakota Mural. Each star was placed by a student who worked on the mural. It will hang on the south wall of the third floor during Sunday’s Youth Art Month reception.

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Architecture for the Birds

January 1, 1970 - to
Architecture for the Birds

An intriguing project is on display through the weekend in our Atrium – Architecture for the Birds: A Design Competition for Beginning Architecture Students. NDSU architecture students have taken the needs of a particular species of bird, then designed a house that fits their needs while calling upon the design philosophy of a well-known architect. Here’s a photo:

This is a home designed for an eastern bluebird designed around the philosophy of Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, designers of the De Young Museum in San Francisco. The designer of the birdhouse writes that “a focus on the strong parallel lines used in the landscape, rooftop and interior spaces inspired my design.”

Another:

This is a home for a kestrel, a type of falcon. It’s designed around the work of modernist architect Richard Meier and based on his design for the Jubilee Church in Rome.

And one more:

This design is for the aptly named house wren inspired by the work of British architect Richard Rogers. As wrens typically build nests in tangles and thickets, Rogers’ functionalist idea that the inner workings of a building be made visible mirrors the needs of the wren.

So far, we’ve seen a sizable turnout of visitors to see the houses and our usual Thursday lunch crowd took a few curious moments to wander among them. Not only are they interesting on their own, but the display itself, overall, is a bit of eye candy:

Again, the birdhouses will only be up through the weekend, so come by and vote for your favorite. The winner of the vote will receive a “people’s choice” award. A professional jury will also award prizes. The Audobon Society will hold an auction of the birdhouses after their display in an effort to support the health and habitat of birds in our region. You can go to www.audobon.org for details.

(All photos by Britta Trygstad, Milestones Photography)

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We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

January 1, 1970 - to
We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

Visitors of all ages took in the School Spirit reception.

On Sunday, the Museum hosted a reception in observation of Youth Art Month, celebrating the work of hundreds of K-12 student artists from around the region. Over 700 students, parents, and observers attended, browsing some 300 art works representing 731 students. Many pieces were collaborations among large groups of students, while others represented individual selections made by the students’ teachers.

Youth Art Month was founded in 1961 (Wikipedia) by the Arts & Creative Materials Institute, Inc., (ACMI) in cooperation with the National Art Education Association (NAEA), as a way to stress the value of art education in the development of young people, to secure the commitment of the general public to the cause of art education, and to raise awareness of art education issues with government and community leaders. Further, Youth Art Month offers a perfect opportunity to celebrate the efforts of budding artists at the beginning of their artistic lives.

Two attendees watch a performance by the Fargo Moorhead Youth Symphony.

Back in 2003, the Museum began encouraging art educators in Fargo-Moorhead and neighboring communities to select student art for display during Youth Art Month. Since then, participation with the project and attendance at the reception have grown substantially each year; our first year, 150 people came to the reception. Over seven years, it has increased to 700 attendees.

Students and teachers both enjoyed the opportunity to have student work featured in the show. Hannah Juhnke, a 10th grader from Hawley, Minn., gave credit to her teacher, Tara Hager, for finding this outlet for her students.

“There aren’t a lot of art museums around Hawley,” Juhnke said, with a laugh (You can see her graphite drawing “Tender Sympathy”, below). “Mrs. Hager is the one that seeks out different competitions and art museums where our work can be featured.” She plans on pursuing a career in the arts after high school. Paige Davis, a senior from Hawley, doesn’t want to make art for a living but she was still excited to be part of the exhibition.

Paige Davis, "Laugh Out Loud"

“I never thought my cow would make it here,” she said, referencing her print (right). “It’s pretty cool to come here and see everyone’s stuff.”

Hager and fellow teacher Hannah Meyer, a K-6 art teacher from Pelican Rapids, Minn., agreed that the exhibition was an important part of a larger effort to instill artistic skills at a crucial age. Although the decision of which pieces were to be included in the show rested in their hands, Meyer said that selecting the pieces was a good way to acknowledge deserving students.

“I have a school of 450 students and I could only choose four or five pieces,” Meyer said. “It was hard, but it wasn’t. You pick kids that really work hard and deserve it and would appreciate the opportunity to have their work hanging in a show like this.”

Ben-Haim was equally excited for the opportunities the students received as well as the opportunity for families to visit the exhibition together.

“Everybody is so thankful for the attention,” she said. “The students are proud, the parents are proud. It’s really nice.”

Hannah Juhnke, "Tender Sympathy"

The student work will remain on exhibit through March 28 on the 3rd floor of the Museum. If you have any questions about the exhibition or about Youth Art Month, please call Sandy at 701.232.3821 ext. 109.

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We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

January 1, 1970 - to
We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do

Visitors of all ages took in the School Spirit reception.

On Sunday, the Museum hosted a reception in observation of Youth Art Month, celebrating the work of hundreds of K-12 student artists from around the region. Over 700 students, parents, and observers attended, browsing some 300 art works representing 731 students. Many pieces were collaborations among large groups of students, while others represented individual selections made by the students’ teachers.

Youth Art Month was founded in 1961 (Wikipedia) by the Arts & Creative Materials Institute, Inc., (ACMI) in cooperation with the National Art Education Association (NAEA), as a way to stress the value of art education in the development of young people, to secure the commitment of the general public to the cause of art education, and to raise awareness of art education issues with government and community leaders. Further, Youth Art Month offers a perfect opportunity to celebrate the efforts of budding artists at the beginning of their artistic lives.

Two attendees watch a performance by the Fargo Moorhead Youth Symphony.

Back in 2003, the Museum began encouraging art educators in Fargo-Moorhead and neighboring communities to select student art for display during Youth Art Month. Since then, participation with the project and attendance at the reception have grown substantially each year; our first year, 150 people came to the reception. Over seven years, it has increased to 700 attendees.

Students and teachers both enjoyed the opportunity to have student work featured in the show. Hannah Juhnke, a 10th grader from Hawley, Minn., gave credit to her teacher, Tara Hager, for finding this outlet for her students.

“There aren’t a lot of art museums around Hawley,” Juhnke said, with a laugh (You can see her graphite drawing “Tender Sympathy”, below). “Mrs. Hager is the one that seeks out different competitions and art museums where our work can be featured.” She plans on pursuing a career in the arts after high school. Paige Davis, a senior from Hawley, doesn’t want to make art for a living but she was still excited to be part of the exhibition.

Paige Davis, "Laugh Out Loud"

“I never thought my cow would make it here,” she said, referencing her print (right). “It’s pretty cool to come here and see everyone’s stuff.”

Hager and fellow teacher Hannah Meyer, a K-6 art teacher from Pelican Rapids, Minn., agreed that the exhibition was an important part of a larger effort to instill artistic skills at a crucial age. Although the decision of which pieces were to be included in the show rested in their hands, Meyer said that selecting the pieces was a good way to acknowledge deserving students.

“I have a school of 450 students and I could only choose four or five pieces,” Meyer said. “It was hard, but it wasn’t. You pick kids that really work hard and deserve it and would appreciate the opportunity to have their work hanging in a show like this.”

Ben-Haim was equally excited for the opportunities the students received as well as the opportunity for families to visit the exhibition together.

“Everybody is so thankful for the attention,” she said. “The students are proud, the parents are proud. It’s really nice.”

Hannah Juhnke, "Tender Sympathy"

The student work will remain on exhibit through March 28 on the 3rd floor of the Museum. If you have any questions about the exhibition or about Youth Art Month, please call Sandy at 701.232.3821 ext. 109.

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